nepali

AND THUS, I ANNOUNCE MY CANDIDACY FOR NEPAL PM

It’s official. I hereby announce that in the next few years, I will be running for the position of Prime Minister of Nepal. Do vote for me, you always-complaining-about-leaders-but-never-realizing-that-it-was-you-who-voted-them Nepalese compatriots.

Phew. Be cool. Deep breath.

Really, just three sentences were all that I needed? Writing about that eased the frustration that I had accumulated over the course of my life. Well, you never know the power of three sentences!

Nepal’s political scenario is something that I have written about often. Some are filled with anger, some with desperation and some with an attempt to make a genuine point. None of them are as promising as it must have been. I mean, look at us. All we care about is putting blame on those 70+-year-old leaders whom we should be giving more elderly respect. Sorry, should not have said that. But I just did. So, screw you.

Where was I?! Ah, announcing my candidacy. Seriously, I want to fulfill the prophecy of being the nice and handsome PM who steered the country to the new era just like Justin Trudeau is doing in Canada right now. Then, Nepalese will not have to complain about an uneducated person becoming the PM or elaborating about the history of UK PMs who had their education at Oxford College. Come on, people. I understand your sentimentality but that is not how things get sorted out. Nor it had ever been. Never. Someone needs to stand up and just declare his candidacy like I am doing right now.

What’s that? My spidey-senses are already active.

What is this author talking about? Is he stupid? Is he mocking the person who pushed PM Deuba too far in the ‘Sanjha Sawaal’ discussion? If you are so full of confidence, then why don’t you run for PM some day.

More blame. Poor us. Some habits never die. Something does not go our way. Find a person to put that blame on. And to answer your question. You bet, I did. I am mocking him. But not only him. You, me, the entire Nepali voters. We need to understand that pushing our PM to his limits is doing no good. The video will become an internet sensation in the Nepali diaspora. Maybe get retweeted a lot of times. Or commented on. Or find some bloggers, like me, to write about. The incident will be ephemeral. People will forget about it sooner than you think. That is the world we live in. The social media world. You only become famous for few seconds before others snatch the fame from you.

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This is serious stuff. (Image source: Buzzzle.com)

I hate that I have to do this. I love it, too. Finally, I don’t have to see my people sitting on their sofa and complaining about Nepal never getting properly developed or never getting freed from the chains of corruption. The sooner the prophecy turns true, the sooner the agony will vanish. Nepali will be able to focus on improving their business and divert their time to discussing intellectual matters. I don’t recall the last time we had meaningful discussions taking place or laid out the blueprints for a bright future. I don’t recall a time where we put together our list of strengths and used that to our advantage. Isn’t backbiting about others’ weaknesses one of the proud things we do when we have nothing else to do? This is one of the worst ways to waste our time. Nothing to gain unless the person we are backbiting about isn’t there because we are not giving that person a chance to improve on his weakness.

The biggest obstacle of our generation is that we fail to recognize that the promising candidates share the same ambitions and hopes as us. We refrain from voting for them because they just don’t have any experience in politics. We think that they are just a new breed who have lived in East Blue all their lives and not ventured into the Grand Line or even the dangerous New World. We forget that their aim is to reach Raftel, the furthest point in One Piece.

You know the greatest paradox of all time: You require experience to get a job. You seek a job to get the experience. Such a crazy world we live in. When I first voted in Nepal, I did not vote the promising candidates because I believed that would be a waste of my precious vote. I thought they showed good promises but lacked any political experience to do the job properly.  My amateur thoughts. Instead, I voted for the old parties’ candidates. I know some of you did the same. I am pretty sure if I run for PM, not many will vote for me because I am unknown in the Nepali diaspora. Just as was the case for Arsene Wenger when he was officially the manager for Arsenal FC; however, given the chance, he went on to become the greatest manager Arsenal FC has ever known.

So, just give the promising candidates a chance. Maybe they will fulfill our prophecy. Whatever happens, stay with them. Have faith. Have your parents and families believe in these candidates.  Don’t let selfish feelings cloud your rational judgment.

Stop complaining and putting the blame on someone else. Stop waiting for that Someone who will put this country out of misery. Stop hoping that someone brave enough will challenge to oppose the bandh. Stop hoping that someone will ask questions that will break the hopes of the leaders. Stop talking about all of your miseries. Stop this chain of events. How long have we been waiting for this miracle? It’s been years. No one has arrived or will arrive. We should all make our moves. Let’s do this together.

So, have I made you believe in me? I announce my candidacy once again. Now, will you vote for me?

SHH…THANK YOU LETTERS IN YOUR INBOX

Yeah, you guys heard it right.

In the next couple of months, I have decided to send a thank you note to almost all the people who have made differences in my life. The degree of difference does not carry any weightage to me. Even if people lent me their pencils in the exam, they deserve a thank you note.

I know it will be tough. That is exactly why I want to do this. On the new year’s day 2016, someone in the WordPress community talked about his experience of writing a thank you note to all his LinkedIn followers throughout 2015. He had written almost 1100 unique thank-you email/LinkedIn messages. It was amazing to see someone devote a part of his time to thank others who devoted theirs.

So, yeah, the inspiration from that blogger has influenced me to push myself. There are no fixed people in my list. It could be anyone. Family, friends, teachers, mentors, coworkers, brothers, sisters, followers. It could be in any medium. Email, text message, Viber message, Facebook message, or you may even get a phone call from me.

Now, most of you may already be thinking, “Since he’s a blogger, he is definitely going to write the same messages to all his people. Just CTRL+C and then CTRL+V.” Sorry, I won’t. Where’s the fun in that! If I decide to implement it (which I won’t), I will have finished the task in one day.

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Life’s too unpredictable as the weather! That is why I am gonna go along with it. (From left: me, Bikash and Achyut)

When you think about it, the task I am going to carry requires a lot of effort and thinking along the way. I have to emphasize about the relationships that I have developed with these people and mention few incidents with them that affected my life. Talk about how encouraging they were. Debate about how their weird opinions shaped my cognitive skills. Appreciate about the sacrifices they gave me in order to make me a better human being. Idolize about their visionary insights into some pressing matters that I was interested in. Pardon about any differences we had over the course of my life. Grateful for their considerations into picking me for their works. Providing me with even the smallest suggestion in whatever problem I was leading into. Anything in the way they molded me into the present Manasbi.

Tough work, right. Well, lo and behold, any day in this year, you maybe the lucky one to get a thank you note from me. Take time to read that. I may have spent days to write those two or so paragraphs. I am not so picky about getting a reply back because I may not be an inspirational figure to you in any sorts. Just be patient about getting one from me. You may or may not get it. It all rests on probability.

I am looking forward to learning from this awesome experience and share my thoughts along the way. Lastly, the very absolute reason that I wanted to do this was because sometimes I feel that life may be unpredictable and ephemeral at the same time. I may or may not live to be 80 years old. I may die this very instant, next day, next month, next 5 years or next 30 years. What I do not want to do is wait before it is too late to thank all the people who helped me along the course of my life.

Take time to imagine what the body of my letter to you folks would be like!

 

DAI, EK PLATE MO:MO LYAUNU NA!

Mo:mo. Nepali Dumplings. THE 8th wonder of Nepal. THE staple food in the afternoon. THE most talked about food in Nepal. THE food that Nepalese can do anything to get their hands on. THE food about which many have already written numerous accounts and their fascination with it. THE food which did not get any mention from me until now. This post is about the stories I had when this mo:mo was/was not around.

Well, if you are one those people who spent a majority of your schooling years living inside your school and rarely get a chance to taste exotic dishes such as mo:mo, then the sight is truly divine. The moment I and all the students who went outside the school to nearby shops (we were restricted to go outside the school boundary), the first thing that we did was to gather around a thela and ask for three or four plates of mo:mo. For some, it was seven or more plates in one go. Normally, we get either eight or ten mo:mo in a plate. It was a common practice to see BNKSians out in the streets every Friday in the mo:mo shops and spending upto NRs. 100 per plate. We tasted Everest mo:mo, Sangam mo:mo and Darjeeling’s Unique mo:mo. I really liked Darjeeling duo’s mo:mo. Truly, one of the best treats we got although they only served vegetable mo:mos.

In my senior year at the school, our group of School prefects would go outside Narayansthan (our school address) and eat mo:mos. We continued this tradition when our friends gave treat to their fellow peers when they got the opportunity to pursue undergraduate degrees in the US. Even in birthdays, we would take our friends for mo:mo treat. Mo:mo was our first choice in almost every celebrations.

Once, after the school had organized its Annual School Fest in 2012, me and my friends, Sawal and Bibash, went to Darjeeling duo’s “Unique mo:mo” pasal. Midway into our treat, three of our female friends came in and they had to wait for an empty table for their next turn. We finished our mo:mos and were preparing to go out. However, these girls decided to block our paths with their feet stretched by sitting in a bench and covering the alley. Now, for anyone not familiar with Nepal’s culture, this may be a casual prank. Well, it is not. In Nepal, you are not allowed to jump over girls or touch with your feet as our culture believes that girls are pious and tantamount to goddesses. Now, in that particular instance, our beliefs were about to get shattered. The girls were too stubborn to let us go. We did not have any choice but to go against our beliefs. We could not do it for numerous attempts. Then, the inevitable happened. For the first time in my life, out of absolute necessity, I forgot my beliefs and escaped from the trap. I became a bad boy. As for my friends, they passed easily after the girls were amazed by my antics and decided not to block my friends’ paths (or so I guessed).

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Bibek and Sailesh having mo:mos in Cafe Himalaya in Queens, NYC.

In another instance, Prabesh, Rajnish and me were just returning after visiting few places in Pokhara, my home town. We were obviously tired. Then, we decided to have …. mo:mos! Well, Prabesh (who also lives in Pokhara) took us to a new mo:mo shop and it was in an area that I often went past whenever I went shopping but which I never had stepped inside. Samrat mo:mo pasal. It was the first time that I had entered this shop and the first time that I had a free vegetable soup before I had mo:mos. A new experience for me.

When I was around 11, I had my first taste of chicken mo:mo. Always, me and my sister would order vegetable mo:mos. Once, when our cousin brother came in, he decided to order chicken mo:mo without consulting us! Once it was ordered, we had no choice but to taste it. We did. Our first taste of chicken mo:mos.

A few years later, I had my first taste of green colored mo:mos. Yeah, from “8 o’clock Restaurant”. Interesting, I thought. A new experience.

Even in my home, we cooked mo:mos every once a month. A family get together. My siblings and I helped our parents and our kaka and kaki. It was here that I first learnt how to make mo:mos. The best thing about cooking at your home is that you have the appetite to eat more than 40 mo:mos without any difficulties. My maximum is 35 mo:mos in a space of one and a half hour. I really miss my home’s mo:mos. No emoji can express it. I am honest about it.

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My birthday celebration in Oct 2014 with mo:mo treat in New Road, Kathmandu. 

Here in the USA, I consider it a treat to taste mo:mos. I had first taste of mo:mos in the eve of Thanksgiving day at my kaka‘s home in Dartmouth, three long months after I first came to the USA. I tried to help my kaki to prepare raw mo:mos. I was disappointed at my poor performance. I managed to prepare three mo:mos by the time she prepared 17 of them. Poor me. I managed to eat around 30 mo:mos that night. Who wouldn’t if it was the first in a long time and in a foreign country?

Immediately, in the Black Friday day two days later, ten of my friends decided to check out Cafe Himalaya mo:mos in Queens, NY. I had heard that it offered the best mo:mos in all of NY. What I heard was true. It was too good. $7/plate spent good. By the way, you would get almost six plates back in Nepal.

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(Clockwise from bottom left): Rajat, me, Bibek and Sailesh having mo:mos at Cafe Himalaya in Black Friday.

One month later, at my cousin sister’s home in Boston, I had the luxury to taste mo:mos once again. Another great treat. Another more than 30 mo:mos. Fantasy turning into reality. Three mo:mos treat within a month.

So, yeah. When we talk about mo:mos, we focus mostly on the texture and the taste we get in various shops. We compare the rates. What we fail to appreciate are the stories we connect to ourselves. Stories of desperation. Stories of fantasies. Stories of new experiences. Stories of coming near to opposing our beliefs. Stories of connectedness. Stories of friendship. Stories of watching live sports together. A whole bunch of stories inspire the very best in us. It is all possible just because we yearn for that one plate of mo:mos whenever we find time to have one.